How long have you had a website?

I know, it sounds like a trick question. The first commercial sites started popping up two decades ago — and chances are your site has existed in some iteration for a while now. Like my own business, you probably started out with a static site. Something akin to the online version of a corporate brochure. But, over time, and as the tools and technology changed, your website has become bigger, more customized — and possibly more than a little bloated too.

It’s time for a content audit.

The thing I love about WordPress is that I don’t need a Webmaster to add new posts and pages. I just log on and build. I have more pages than the average small business website, but not so many that I can’t track them and identify what is where.

The bigger your website, the more complex the site navigation.

While most larger organizations have at least some gate-keeping rules around who can post and where (and, if you don’t, you should), the rules mostly govern adding content. They’re rarely about subtraction.

That’s where a content audit comes in.

You should periodically audit your website for outdated, redundant, and irrelevant content.

Content Audit: broken links in the wind

Outdated content, such as:

  • broken links
  • old landing pages
  • obsolete offers

Doorbell on a Wall

Redundant content, such as:

  • duplicate product pages
  • misplaced information
  • keyword confusion

Trivia

Irrelevant content, such as:

  • contests
  • old quizzes and trivia
  • clip-art

As part of your audit, don’t neglect your metrics. Your site data offers a good window into where people land on your website and how they navigate it. What pages are most popular? What are people searching for? Are there pages you think are important that no one is visiting?

Finally, a content audit is a great opportunity to refocus on the information that is important to your site visitors. Is your site aimed at them or at you?

Broken links by joshwept; misplaced doorbell by neosnaps; trivia by gmahender.